Posts Tagged ‘grief’

It is the third year of my medical school and I am in a psychiatric ER, against my will, and on the phone with my course director who states the dean promises that they will treat this incident just like any other acute illness requiring hospitalization.

How did I get there? I think it was a perfect storm. Sure, almost every month I have times where I am actively planning every little detail of my death, but this time was different. It was Ramadan thus I was fasting from food/liquid and because of this I had not taken my Ritalin for 2 weeks or so. At first it wasn’t going so bad but suddenly, or so it seems to me, I started crying at the slightest thing. People would make tiny criticisms and I’d just fall apart.

It was also the anniversary of my grandmothers death, who you know was very close to me. I could feel the fear and apprehension of actually having to face it start to mount.

My wife was also pregnant and in her last weeks. I did not feel prepared, I did not feel like I should be a father.

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Does grief affect someone with autism differently than neurotypicals (those without autism)?

I went to assess a pt who was in end of life and met the pt’s daughter in the hall. She was shaking and saying her mother hadn’t breathed in over a minute. While the nurse tried to calm her down I listened for breath and lung sounds, which there were none. I informed the daughter and she started crying. I started feeling the strong sense of composure and cold detached logic, which I pride myself on, collapse. The wall around my emotions I had been building since my grandmother’s death 3 years ago just gave way and I felt the daughter’s grief affect me on a personal level. As I saw the daughter cry I began identifying with her pain and knowing how deep it runs which tore me apart inside. I felt tears start to well up in my eyes, I tried to say my condolences, hugged her (which I did even though it causes me physical pain because I know neurotypicals need it in times of grief) and quickly escaped the room.

It all seems odd to end up this way as I have spent countless hours focusing on my death, planning it, trying to predict it’s after effects. I looked at death in a logical way, as in an event that is expected end point of any life. Yet I was not prepared for my grandmother’s death and it ended up changing me forever. After the event I didn’t really talk and I started sleeping the days away. I had typical grieving reactions such as thinking I heard her voice or seeing her out of the corner of my eye. I cried for months and found it very hard to not wake up thinking of her. I couldn’t even watch TV shows or commercials that contained grieving people or I would become very upset.

Fast forward 3 years later, and things have become like what Johnny Cash said regarding his brother’s death “I kept talking but everyone stopped listening, so I stopped talking about him”. In this time period, it feels like I have built a wall, a defense system against tragic events effecting me personally. While this may seem cold, it is required if you are a doctor in a field with death being a normal expected event, for example: In my ICU rotation we had someone die around once a day and if I had opened myself up to the experiences of the family because I would have not made it thru. I thought the barriers I had formed over the years were near complete as I had gone thru patient deaths unscathed. Yet, when this patient’s daughter, who I have known only for 6 months, started grieving my defenses completely failed.

I suppose I should have predicted this, for the wall itself is in part a charade. If I was completely healed from my loved one’s death, couldn’t I bring myself to visit her grave? Couldn’t I think of her and things we did without crying? Would I avoid talking about her for fear of the emotional response it will bring?

So I would say yes, in this case an autistic man grieves like any other man.